Check-ups, Tooth pulling and Haircuts??

7 12 2017

Yes, you read that title correctly! This November we hosted a Samaritan’s Purse Canada medical mission where we were able to provide all three services and more!

On November 7, a team of ten Canadians (Ken, Dr.John, Mercedes, Erin, Stephen, Kelli, Darcy, Rhonda, Laura and Betty) arrived in Tabuk City and promptly jumped up on top of a jeepney and took off with us to the mountains!

on top of jeepOur team consisted of the ten Canadians (doctors, Nurse practitioners, nurses, an EMT, a psychologist … the list goes on!) and about 30 local church members, midwives, pastors, interpreters and over 20 members of the Philippine Army.

 

We spent the next 10 days together, bringing all sorts of care to some of the most remote places in Kalinga. One of the places we went to was a municipality called Pasil.

 

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Pasil was one of the hardest hit areas during the typhoon last year and although we had sent some relief supplies we had not yet been able to go there in person. One of the local churches helped to arrange our accommodations in the village and we had lots of patients waiting to see us. We were so happy to have the local municipal doctor and dentist join us for our mission in Pasil so that we could bring even more services!

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Working with the army was a last minute addition to the mission but I can see in hindsight that it probably was God’s plan all along. We needed a dentist to join our team ASAP and so myself and Cheryl, one of the local pastors, visited the army barracks to ask for help. The commander couldn’t have been more welcoming and he promised to send not only a dentist, but a whole group of soldiers to give haircuts in the outreach villages as well as to be our security.

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During our 10-day mission to Pasil, Lucog and Pinukpuk we were able to see over 500 patients for medical check-ups and counselling, 157 dental patients, over 200 haircuts more than 250 eye exams with free glasses, as well as many prenatal check-ups and blood tests! The team also built a much needed wall in our clinic and 2 brand new tables!

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Thank you SP Canada for sending this team to be a blessing to the people of Kalinga!

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Bugnay Stories

10 10 2017

view of Buscalan

We have been busy getting our Bugnay extension clinic up and running since January this year. Finally in June, all of the Bugnay staff moved up to the centre and began setting up, finishing decorating and organizing and visiting patients!

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The Bugnay clinic staff on their way to visit mothers in a neighbouring village.

Since we opened our doors again in June, we have performed hundreds of Primary Healthy Care check-ups, hiked into 4 different villages bringing prenatal care, and done dozens of emergency hospital transports.

Here is a story about a particularly harrowing transport.

Tribal War!  – by Aisling Lynch (Irish missionary midwife currently serving in Bugnay)

We had just finished up our prenatal day and were tidying up the clinic when we heard that tribal war was declared that afternoon between 2 nearby villages. Less than 30 minutes later an ambulance from the nearby Rural Health Unit (RHU) stops outside the clinic and an armed policeman jumps out calling for help. Inside the ambulance was a midwife friend of ours who works at the RHU. There was a young man in the ambulance who had been shot in the head and was going into shock. Their oxygen tank was broken so we swapped it with ours and as our friend was on her own, I got into the ambulance to help her.

The journey to the hospital takes about an hour and it is a very narrow, windy road through the mountains. Myself and the other midwife took turns keeping pressure on the head wound while keeping the young man’s head stable, all the while checking his pulse and blood pressure. There were no seatbelts in the ambulance so it was no easy task to do this for an hour while being thrown around the back of the ambulance every few minutes. A few times on the journey we could not find his pulse but then he opened his eyes just as we were starting CPR. I have never been so relieved as we passed that final bend in the road and saw the hospital in front of us. It was surreal to start our handover to the hospital staff with “Gunshot wound to the head” all the while with 2 fully armed police officers keeping watch.

The young man was stabilized at the local hospital but as they were not equipped for this kind of injury, he was then transferred 6 hours away to another hospital. The last I heard, he survived his injury and is undergoing treatment for a brain injury.

The journey back to the clinic was just as scary but for different reasons. The lights in the ambulance weren’t working well and then is started raining. Guess what else wasn’t working well? That’s right, the windshield wipers! The driver had to drive with his head out the window so that he could see where we were going. Fair play to the driver though, we made it safely back to the clinic!

We are so excited to have our “Waiting Home” open for mothers hiking from far flung villages to deliver with us. Although we have not had our official “Grand Opening” we have delivered 4 babies so far!

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“Itess” and her new baby girl!

We are hoping to combine the “Grand Opening” with our Christmas party so we will hope that the Dept. of Health will expedite our applications!

I will also try to post more regularly!

 





How about some numbers?

23 01 2017

Today I completed our statistics for 2016 for our clinic.

 

Number of women enrolled with us for prenatal care: 531

Number of prenatal check-ups performed : 2276 

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Number of babies born at our clinic: 214

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Transport rate for women in labor: 14% 

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Percentage of deliveries that were first-time moms: 32%

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Number of postpartum visits done: 817

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Percentage of women who had previously delivered unattended: 24%

 

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Thank you for all of your support!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 





Thank you for Feeding the Village of Pakak

2 12 2016
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Junior is excited about his two bags of rice!

After the typhoon in October, many people donated money for the immediate needs of some of the villages close by.

There were supposed to be emergency supplies given by the government but as these things go in the Philippines the supplies did not get to where they were needed.

There are 60 families in Pakak and only 2 of them received any emergency supplies from the government.

Because of your that donations, every person in the village received 2 large cans of rice each!

We will continue to help in this village as well as a few more surrounding ones with the support of Samaritan’s Purse.

But for now … enjoy these thankful smiles!

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Typhoon Lawin (Hawk)

27 10 2016

 

 

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Last week on Wednesday we started hearing that the typhoon headed towards the Philippines may affect us here in the middle of the Island of Luzon. Many of us were unfazed as we have numerous typhoons a year and it usually just means a cooler day with some rain. By Wednesday evening reports started coming in that the typhoon was picking up speed and Kalinga should expect a Signal number 5 (more than 200km/hour winds). I admit that I started to get a bit nervous.

By 11pm on Wednesday night the winds started ripping through the Province of Kalinga. For the next four hours we were bombarded with wind and rain with whole trees being uprooted and roof tops being torn off houses.

Our clinic was flooded on every floor by the rain coming in through every nook and cranny while the office roof was shredded by the winds.

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At our home it was only our garden and trees that were destroyed with our house and car thankfully being spared. Oh and the kids are loving playing amongst all the felled coconut trees next door.

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Driving through town the next day however, Tabuk looked like a different place. So many of the squatter homes at the side of the road were completely demolished. Almost every power line was down. Most of the beautiful tree lined roads were now covered with branches, trees trunks and electrical wires. In our beloved village of Pakak many homes were destroyed and the roof of the church was blown off.

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Tabuk is in the middle of the clean up now. Burning of branches, leaves and garbage is continuous (*cough cough) and the power company is working overtime to get electricity restored. We have heard though that it may take up to two months before we get the electricity back!

Amazingly enough there were very few casualties and for that we are thankful. So we continue to press on with clean up and caring for the women that still need to have their babies.

Oh, another crazy thing, we were bombarded with labors for the week before the typhoon with all six beds full on two occasions. We just finished discharging all our postpartum mothers on Wednesday afternoon … just before the typhoon.  Then, two days after the typhoon we started getting busy again! Could it be that a baby knows when its safe to come out?

(If anyone would like to donate money towards families who have lost their homes or would like to help the church in Pakak to repair their roof, you can click on the donate tab of this website. Be sure to designate the funds for typhoon relief and I will make sure it gets to some of those who need it.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 





Baby #2000 !!

30 07 2016

This month we celebrated the 2000th baby born at our clinic!

For me, this was another signpost of how God keeps providing for us at Abundant Grace of God.

The mother who delivered with us had delivered her other two babies with us as well, so this was an especially joyous occasion.

Mother and baby were given a gift of a new baby bath full of newborn clothes and supplies.

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Welcome to the world baby Eduardo! We are so happy that you made your entrance at our clinic!

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Medical Mission to the Mountains

11 06 2016

This May, we had an amazing opportunity to work together with a team from Samaritan’s Purse Canada sharing God’s love with the tribal people of Kalinga through a medical mission. The team of 13 people consisted of nurses, dental hygienists, an eyeglass team, support workers and a doctor.

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The team rides “top-load” up to the mountains!

We set up camp at the local high school in Tinglayan and for five days we offered medical check-ups, dental care and eyeglasses for all five Butbut villages. We were joined by some awesome Filipino dentists and a doctor from Manila for a few days while we were in the mountains. That was a great blessing!

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Me, Doc Elvie and Doc Jec – our wonderful Filipino dentists.

After 5 days of clinic in the mountains we attended church in Bugnay together with the village members we had been caring for during the week. We had such a fun time singing and dancing and praising the same God together!

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The Canadian team then had a short break to explore the town of Sagada and take in the caving, waterfalls and pottery. After our break we came back down the mountain to our clinic in Tabuk and did two days of outreach for our patients and neighbours.

During the 7 days of outreach we saw over 1500 people, doing medical check-ups (with free medicines), dental check-ups (with free extractions) and eyeglass clinic (giving away free eyeglasses).

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The team was awesome and as we say here in the Philippines, they were really “cowboys”. That means that they never complained when they had to sleep on hard floors with the bathroom quite a distance away, they ate all the food prepared for them although they weren’t used to eating rice three times a day, and they were just basically a pleasure to be around!

Thank you Tammy, Bernie, Nellie, Tina, Barbara, Barb, Patti, Helen, Wes, Shirley, Joanne, Maria and Conchita!!

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The Samaritan’s Purse team along with our Abundant team on our last evening together.