Bugnay Stories

10 10 2017

view of Buscalan

We have been busy getting our Bugnay extension clinic up and running since January this year. Finally in June, all of the Bugnay staff moved up to the centre and began setting up, finishing decorating and organizing and visiting patients!

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The Bugnay clinic staff on their way to visit mothers in a neighbouring village.

Since we opened our doors again in June, we have performed hundreds of Primary Healthy Care check-ups, hiked into 4 different villages bringing prenatal care, and done dozens of emergency hospital transports.

Here is a story about a particularly harrowing transport.

Tribal War!  – by Aisling Lynch (Irish missionary midwife currently serving in Bugnay)

We had just finished up our prenatal day and were tidying up the clinic when we heard that tribal war was declared that afternoon between 2 nearby villages. Less than 30 minutes later an ambulance from the nearby Rural Health Unit (RHU) stops outside the clinic and an armed policeman jumps out calling for help. Inside the ambulance was a midwife friend of ours who works at the RHU. There was a young man in the ambulance who had been shot in the head and was going into shock. Their oxygen tank was broken so we swapped it with ours and as our friend was on her own, I got into the ambulance to help her.

The journey to the hospital takes about an hour and it is a very narrow, windy road through the mountains. Myself and the other midwife took turns keeping pressure on the head wound while keeping the young man’s head stable, all the while checking his pulse and blood pressure. There were no seatbelts in the ambulance so it was no easy task to do this for an hour while being thrown around the back of the ambulance every few minutes. A few times on the journey we could not find his pulse but then he opened his eyes just as we were starting CPR. I have never been so relieved as we passed that final bend in the road and saw the hospital in front of us. It was surreal to start our handover to the hospital staff with “Gunshot wound to the head” all the while with 2 fully armed police officers keeping watch.

The young man was stabilized at the local hospital but as they were not equipped for this kind of injury, he was then transferred 6 hours away to another hospital. The last I heard, he survived his injury and is undergoing treatment for a brain injury.

The journey back to the clinic was just as scary but for different reasons. The lights in the ambulance weren’t working well and then is started raining. Guess what else wasn’t working well? That’s right, the windshield wipers! The driver had to drive with his head out the window so that he could see where we were going. Fair play to the driver though, we made it safely back to the clinic!

We are so excited to have our “Waiting Home” open for mothers hiking from far flung villages to deliver with us. Although we have not had our official “Grand Opening” we have delivered 4 babies so far!

Maritess

“Itess” and her new baby girl!

We are hoping to combine the “Grand Opening” with our Christmas party so we will hope that the Dept. of Health will expedite our applications!

I will also try to post more regularly!

 





A Midwife’s Story

8 01 2016

The following story is a first-hand account from our Bugnay clinic midwife, Karen Ligab.

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Bugnay Midwife Karen

“It was almost 4:00 in the afternoon and I was talking with Achao (my boss) outside the clinic because he was getting ready to go back to the Tabuk clinic, when I noticed many people carrying someone in a hammock towards the clinic. I quickly opened the clinic for them to enter. It is a normal routine for us midwives in Bugnay to be brought people who have had an accident in the fields for First Aid or for wound care, but I was alarmed to see that this was a big emergency as they were carrying our pregnant patient who had been in and out of the hospital for pre-eclampsia. I knew her condition was bad when I saw her because her eyes were not in focus. Before they could even transfer her to the bed she began having a seizure.

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The Bugnay Clinic Delivery Room

I immediately put her on her side and asked the relatives to get my fellow midwives. The patient suddenly became limp and stopped breathing. Her husband and relative started crying and shouting her name. I started doing CPR on her and after 30 chest compressions she began breathing again. Rema and the village midwife quickly came in and started putting in an IV line and giving her oxygen and blood pressure medication because her bp was so high. We then brought her to the car to take her to the hospital. It was such a good thing that Achao was right there ready to take her. In the car on the way to the hospital, the patient started to have another seizure. We gave her an injection of magnesium sulfate, which is a medication to help prevent seizures. The whole way to the hospital we would alternate between monitoring her vital signs and praying for God’s mercy on her and her unborn child. After almost an hour on the road, that seemed like forever, we reached the hospital. At the ER the patient started having another seizure, but we felt secure that she was now safe in the hands of the hospital staff. After giving initial care to the patient, the doctor told us to bring her to the operating room because they were going to perform emergency C-section. We are very thankful to God that the patient’s life was saved and so was her baby.”

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Our sister clinic in the mountains of Bugnay is such an important part of our ministry. Due to lack of supervisory staff we have had to close operation for 2016. Please pray as we plan and prepare to re-open the clinic in 2017.

 





I delivered at Abundant Grace of God because…

4 04 2015

I wanted to share some stories from our patients about why they are choosing to deliver at our clinic.

Anna*

“I was so glad that I delivered here at Abundant Grace of God [Bugnay site] because I felt safe and taken care of well by the staff. Especially that I had a hemorrhage when I gave birth before at [another location], I didn’t feel safe there because when I hemorrhaged it took them so long before they stopped the bleeding.”

Some of the mothers from the village of Buscalan share about their experiences at AGGMC.

Some of the mothers from the village of Buscalan share about their experiences at AGGMC.

One of the mothers from Buscalan (neighbouring villages) that delivered at our Bugnay site.

One of the mothers from Buscalan (neighbouring village) that delivered at our Bugnay site.

Mary*

“I chose [to deliver] here in Abundant Grace of God because the clinic is well ventilated, has very clean rooms and bathrooms and the employees are very kind to their patients, they treat them all equally. Also it is Philhealth accredited.”

*Mary shares at our Labor and Delivery seminar about her experience during the delivery of her first baby at AGGMC.

(*not real names)

We are so glad that the women of Kalinga are choosing to deliver at our clinic and that we have the opportunity to share God’s love with them in a practical way.

Labor and delivery is the time in a woman’s life where she can be the most vulnerable. Too often in the developing world the workers at local health facilities and hospitals use this time as an opportunity to shame the women and make them feel guilty.

The following is a quote from a fellow missionary working at a Birthing Home in Manila. She had the chance to talk with a senior medical student in regards to attitudes surrounding labouring women in the Philippines.

“What I learned was that birth is often seen as an opportunity to shame and frighten the woman giving birth: not because the exhausted, overworked health provider is mean or malicious, but because it is the time when a woman is at her most dependent and vulnerable, that one can instill such hatred for the process that she will not want to bear any more children. It is a time to make the mother feel badly for poor compliance of prenatal check-ups or for being seen as an eyesore to a society desperately trying to pull out of the “developing world” category.”

In contrast, we at AGGMC want women to feel empowered, loved, cared for and protected  during their deliveries.

Our vision is to “Share the Love of God with the families of Kalinga” and we sincerely pray that every woman that enters our facility will feel that they are loved, not only by us but also by their Heavenly Father.





An Emergency Transport in the Mountains

5 03 2015
The amazing and beautiful staff at the Bugnay clinic.

The amazing and beautiful staff at the Bugnay clinic.

I just got back yesterday afternoon from a quick trip to the Bugnay clinic. I was taking one of our partners from Samaritan’s Purse to see the clinic there and also to drop off one of the Tabuk supervising midwives to spend a few weeks with the staff in Bugnay.

While there, the staff updated me on one of our very high risk patients. Mary* had been repeatedly admitted to the hospital for signs of pre-eclampisia throughout her pregnancy and repeatedly sent home “better”. She was now only seven months pregnant and was sent home again from the hospital two days before. My midwife Rema had done a home visit for her that day and her blood pressure was sky high again and she was so swollen that she had a hard time moving around. Rema and the other staff told Mary that she needed to go back to the hospital again. Mary decided she would just follow the doctor’s advice and return on Friday for her regular follow-up check-up. My midwives asked me if I could try to convince her to go back to the hospital. They knew that at any moment she could have a seizure or a stroke and then both she and the baby would be lost.

I agreed to visit her and try to convince her. So just before myself and Raija-Liisa (from SP Canada) left for Tabuk, we went to visit her in her home. I was praying silently as we approached her house that God would give me compassion and the right words to say. When I saw her lying in her bed, so swollen from her feet to her chest, and checked her blood pressure to see it was off the charts,  I was filled with compassion. We spent about an hour with Mary discussing her options and in the end we decided instead of taking her back to the closest hospital (who kept sending her home) we would take her back with us to Tabuk.

The midwives at the clinic started an IV line on Mary (which wasn’t an easy feat with all her edema) and we lay her down in the back of the car and drove to Tabuk. When we reached the hospital, the doctors and nurses immediately started caring for her. Her blood pressure was even higher than when we left Bugnay and she was starting to have severe headaches. The staff were unable to find the baby’s heartbeat. They were planning to get her prepped for an ultrasound when Raija and I left her in the hands of the very capable staff.

A few hours later I received a text from the doctor that she had performed a cesarean section and delivered a stillborn baby. Mary’s life had been saved but unfortunately not her baby’s as well.

It is heartbreaking to think of Mary’s loss, but I know that if she hadn’t had the C-section on that day that her life could have been lost as well. (The only cure for preeclampsia is delivery of baby and placenta. There is no other treatment. If left untreated, eclampsia will cause multi-organ failure, seizures and/or stroke and ultimately death for the pregnant woman).

Please pray for Mary and her family as they grieve their loss.

Please pray for the Bugnay staff as they continue to grow in strength, skill and wisdom in dealing with these very difficult cases in such a remote area.

(*not her real name)





What about some numbers …

9 01 2015

I thought it may interest everyone to hear some numbers from Abundant Grace of God.

One of the best things about being supported by a German organization (Geshenke der Hoffnung eV:  www.geschenke-der-hoffnung.org) is that they have forced me to keep track of the things we are doing so that we are able to calculate our effectiveness and impact. Let me tell you that statistics are not something that I enjoy, but since doing this I have been excited to see the numbers of people we have been reaching with God’s love.

2014 Statistics!

588  ~ women were enrolled in prenatal care.

3287  ~ prenatal visits were done.

Midwife B-Lyn during prenatal check-up.

Midwife B-Lyn during prenatal check-up

1360  ~ postpartum visits were done.

286  ~ women delivered at AGGMC.

Bugnay clinic patients at Christmas party.

Bugnay clinic patients at Christmas party.

236  ~ women attended a prenatal seminar with devotions.

5030  ~ is number of times that we prayed for patients at AGGMC.

Well-Baby graduates.

Well-Baby graduates.

50   ~  mothers were trained in an 8-session program of basic childcare.(Well-Baby Program)

40   ~ outreaches were done in villages surrounding our clinics in Tabuk and Bugnay.

Outreach into Lacnog.

Outreach into Lacnog.

31  ~ Filipino student midwives received short-term training at our clinic.

8  ~  of the AGGMC staff had babies this year 🙂

Claire (L) our nurse and Kate (R) our Social Worker.

Claire (L) our nurse and Kate (R) our Social Worker.

6    ~ missionary midwives received training.

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3  ~  new Registered Filipino Midwives were trained and hired at AGGMC.

Karen and Gail doing hands-on practice.

9%  ~  of women were transferred to hospital during labor.

32%   ~ of women who delivered with us were first-time moms.

40%  ~ of women who delivered with us had previously delivered at home unattended.

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0   ~ Maternal deaths

0   ~ Newborn deaths

100%   ~ of women surveyed said that they experienced God’s love at AGGMC.

 

Thank you for your continued support to make 2015 an even better year than last!

 

 

 

 





“Birth House for Sale”

1 08 2014
Abundant Grace of God, Bugnay

Abundant Grace of God, Bugnay

I just got back from a quick trip to the mountains to check up on our sister clinic “Lajad Apodios Lying-In” – that is the Butbut translation for Abundant Grace of God …sort of 🙂

I had the chance to introduce Suzie Campana, our new missionary midwife and Bugnay clinic Facilitator, to the staff and mothers of Bugnay.

Suzie and the midwives hiking into the Village of Bugnay

Suzie and the midwives hiking into the Village of Bugnay

We hiked into the village and shared at the Well-Baby seminar which we host monthly for the mothers of Bugnay. This month’s topic was all about Tuberculosis; the signs and symptoms as well as transmission and treatment. Tuberculosis is a disease that still has a huge effect on the families of Bugnay and surrounding villages.

Me and my shadow sharing at the Well-Baby seminar.

Me and my shadow sharing at the Well-Baby seminar.

The Bugnay clinic has been open for over two years now and we have been working out of an old home which we renovated into a clinic. The house is in a perfect spot as it is central to all five Butbut villages and is right next to the main road.

We only had a two-year lease on the house, so since we opened we had been looking all over and around Bugnay for somewhere we could build another clinic or renovate another house. Nothing was available or else it was way too much money.

Then, a few months ago, the landlord of the current clinic building told us that he wanted to sell it.

The price is reasonable (much less than it would cost to start from scratch) and the location is perfect.

The cost of the clinic building and lot is $12,000USD.  This August we need to give the first instalment of $6000. The next instalment is due in one year.

We already have $2500 towards the first payment. We just need another $3500 by the middle of August.

Would any of you like to be a part of keeping this very important clinic up and running? If so, I want to invite you to donate towards the “Bugnay Clinic Fund”.

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Donating is very easy and 100% of what you give will go directly to the project.

Just click on this link: http://www.msccanada.org/Donate/PayPal-donations.html

and when you get to the MSC site, click on the “Give” menu on the homepage.

Then choose my name from the scroll down menu on the “Mission Workers” menu.

Ok, it may be a little confusing if you are my dad … but I think most of you will be able to follow it 😉

If giving financially is not something you can do right now, please pray with us and stay tuned for the miracles that God does in the next few weeks!